Text too small in X Windows when using nvidia-drivers

In an earlier post titled ‘Switching between Intel and NVIDIA graphics processors on a laptop with NVIDIA Optimus hardware running Gentoo Linux‘ I described how I am able to switch between the closed-source NVIDIA video driver and the open-source Intel video driver on a Clevo W230SS laptop with NVIDIA Optimus hardware. This works nicely, but one thing had been niggling me for over a year: the size of the fonts in the Desktop Environment were much smaller when using the NVIDIA driver than when using the Intel driver. I could of course increase the font size via KDE’s ‘System Settings’ > ‘Font’ when using the NVIDIA driver, but then I would have to reduce the font size the same way when using the Intel driver. So I resolved to find a better way, and all I needed to do was add one line to the Monitor section in xorg.conf to specify the DPI (Dots Per Inch) for the X Screen when using the NVIDIA driver:

Section "Monitor"
    Identifier     "Monitor0"
    Option         "DPMS"
    Option         "DPI" "96 x 96"
EndSection

You can read more about this in the NVIDIA Accelerated Linux Graphics Driver README and Installation Guide, Appendix B. X Config Options.

As described in my earlier post, I run a script to copy a file I named xorg.conf.nvidia to xorg.conf when I want to use the NVIDIA driver, and another script to copy a file I named xorg.conf.intel to xorg.conf when I want to use the Intel driver. So all I needed to do was add the line Option "DPI" "96 x 96" to the Monitor section in the file xorg.conf.nvidia and run my script to switch to the NVIDIA driver. Problem finally solved.

Office 2007 mime-type problem in KDE Plasma 5

Further to my 2015 post Office 2007 mime-type problem in KDE, another problem opening Excel .xlsm files in Office 2007 with WINE in Gentoo Linux Stable happened to me recently, this time in KDE Plasma 5.5.5. Whenever I clicked on an Excel macro-enabled spreadsheet file myspreadsheet.xlsm in Dolphin, a pop-up window titled ‘Choose Application – Dolphin’ would prompt me to ‘Select the program you want to use to open the file myspreadsheet.xlsm’. When I selected Microsoft Excel 2007 from the ‘Known Applications’ list and ticked ‘Remember application association for all files of type “Excel macro-enabled spreadsheet” (application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12)’, Excel would launch and load the spreadsheet. However, the next time I double-clicked the file, the pop-up window would prompt me again. So I tried setting the file association via ‘System Settings’ > ‘Applications’ > ‘File Associations’. Now, there are three entries under ‘Known Types’: vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12, vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroenabled.12 and x-wine-extension-xlsmhtml. However, there was no application listed in the box ‘Application Preference Order’ for vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12, and, if I added Microsoft Excel 2007 to the list and clicked ‘Apply’, the new entry would disappear immediately.

Unlike the situation described in the above-mentioned post, the mime type for the .xlsm file appeared correct:

$ file myspreadsheet.xlsm
myspreadsheet.xlsm: Microsoft Excel 2007+
$ xdg-mime query filetype myspreadsheet.xlsm
application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12

The file /usr/share/mime/subclasses contains ‘macroEnabled‘ rather than ‘macroenabled‘:

$ grep macroenabled /usr/share/mime/subclasses
$ grep macroEnabled /usr/share/mime/subclasses
application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.binary.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
application/vnd.ms-excel.addin.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
application/vnd.ms-powerpoint.slideshow.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.slideshow
application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
application/vnd.ms-powerpoint.presentation.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation
application/vnd.ms-word.template.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.template
application/vnd.ms-excel.template.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.template
application/vnd.ms-powerpoint.template.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.template
application/vnd.ms-word.document.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document
application/vnd.ms-powerpoint.slide.macroEnabled.12 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.slide

but the work-around mentioned in my 2015 post (i.e. replacing ‘macroEnabled‘ with ‘macroenabled‘ in the file /usr/share/mime/subclasses) did not fix the latest problem: I was still prompted to choose an application every time I double-clicked on a .xlsm file. So I reverted to the original contents of /usr/share/mime/subclasses (i.e. back to ‘macroEnabled‘) and looked in the directory /usr/share/mime/application/ to see what it contained for Excel spreadsheets:

$ ls -1 /usr/share/mime/application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.*
/usr/share/mime/application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.binary.macroenabled.12.xml
/usr/share/mime/application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroenabled.12.xml

As there was no file for vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12.xml I decided to create one to see if that would solve the problem:

$ sudo cp /usr/share/mime/application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroenabled.12.xml /usr/share/mime/application/vnd.ms-excel.sheet.macroEnabled.12.xml

It did! If I click on a .xlsm file now, Excel 2007 launches and opens the spreadsheet.

Getting KDE Plasma 5 to work with the NVIDIA closed-source driver in Gentoo Linux

Up until a few days ago I had avoided migrating from KDE 4 to KDE Plasma 5, Frameworks 5 and Applications 5 — I’ll refer to the latter three package categories collectively as ‘KDE:5’ — on my main laptop, a Clevo W230SS with NVIDIA Optimus hardware and Gentoo Linux Stable Branch installed. My reluctance to migrate to KDE:5 was because of various problems I experience in KDE:5 on my Compal NBLB2 laptop, which has Gentoo Testing Branch installed (currently Plasma 5.7.1, which you would expect to be less buggy than Plasma 5.5.5 in the Gentoo Stable Branch).

Recently the maintainers of Gentoo’s KDE ebuilds removed some of the KDE 4 ebuilds and made some of the other ebuilds dependent on KDE:5. It became more complicated and convoluted to keep KDE 4 going, so I reluctantly threw in the towel and migrated to KDE:5 on my main laptop. I wish I could have kept KDE 4 on that machine, as KDE 4 worked extremely well (and looked great too).

My first problem after migrating was the infamous black screen in X Windows at start-up. Trying the various suggestions in the Gentoo Wiki did not help and, for the first time since I’ve owned the Clevo laptop, I was glad it has NVIDIA Optimus hardware as I was able to change from using nvidia-drivers to using xf86-video-intel, which got me to a usable Desktop after I switched desktop managers from SDDM (see the system log file error messages below) to LightDM.

Jul 17 04:32:37 clevow230ss sddm-helper[3245]: PAM unable to dlopen(/lib64/security/pam_systemd.so): /lib64/security/pam_systemd.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
Jul 17 04:32:37 clevow230ss sddm-helper[3245]: PAM adding faulty module: /lib64/security/pam_systemd.so

Although I had merged x11-misc/sddm with USE="-systemd" because my installation uses OpenRC, the above error messages made me suspect that something is wrong with the sddm-0.13.0-r3 ebuild, which is why I switched to LightDM.

However, using solely the Intel driver is not a long-term solution for me because DraftSight CAD software is slower with the Intel driver, so I was keen to get Plasma 5 working with the closed-source NVIDIA driver (I do not want to use Bumblebee).

I managed to get LightDM and Plasma 5 working with nvidia-drivers by doing the following:

  1. Merge x11-misc/lightdm.
  2. Re-merge kde-plasma/plasma-meta with USE="-sddm".
  3. Remove the x11-misc/sddm package and kde-plasma/sddm-kcm package by using the command ‘emerge --ask --depclean‘.
  4. Edit the file /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf to add the line ‘greeter-session=lightdm-kde-greeter‘ as specified in Gentoo Wiki article LightDM.
  5. Edit the file /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf to add the line ‘display-setup-script=/etc/X11/Sessions/plasma‘ (any file name would do).
  6. Create the above-mentioned Bash script /etc/X11/Sessions/plasma containing the following:
#!/bin/bash
GPU=`eselect opengl list | grep \* | awk '{ print $2 }'`
if [ "$GPU" = "nvidia" ]; then
    xrandr --setprovideroutputsource modesetting NVIDIA-0
    xrandr --auto
fi

I can now switch between the NVIDIA closed-source driver and the Intel open-source driver using the method described in an earlier post: Switching between Intel and NVIDIA graphics processors on a laptop with NVIDIA Optimus hardware running Gentoo Linux.

After updating Firefox for Linux, the folder icons in the bookmarks menu disappeared

Only a short post this time, but this problem has been annoying me for a few weeks. I use KDE 4.14 (kde-meta-4.14.3-r1) in Gentoo Linux on my main laptop, and recently upgraded Firefox to Version 46.0. The folder icons in Firefox’s bookmarks menu were no longer visible, although favicons were still visible in the bookmarks menu. The 2011 mozillaZine Forums thread After updating- ff4 bookmark folder icons disappeared [Linux] steered me in the right direction: I checked KDE 4’s ‘System Settings’ > ‘Application Appearance’ > ‘GTK’ and found that ‘Show icons in GTK menus’ was not ticked. I ticked this and clicked on ‘Apply’, and the problem was solved.

Elogviewer: A handy GUI for viewing Portage elog messages in Gentoo Linux

When merging (installing) packages in Gentoo, ebuilds often output console messages with information or warnings from the writer of the ebuild, usually at the end of the installation process. However, these ‘elog’ messages will not be displayed if you have configured the environment variable EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS so as to merge packages quietly or in parallel. Even if you did not configure EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS that way, it is easy to miss these messages as they scroll up and off screen if several packages are merging, one after the other.

The Gentoo package manager Portage has a logging facility that, if enabled, will log these elog messages to files so that you can review them afterwards. You can enable this facility by editing the file /etc/portage/make.conf and adding the environment variable PORTAGE_ELOG_SYSTEM="save" and the environment variable PORTAGE_ELOG_CLASSES with one or more logging classes. Here are the relevant lines from the file /etc/portage/make.conf on my laptop:

PORT_LOGDIR="/var/log/portage"
PORTAGE_ELOG_SYSTEM="save"
PORTAGE_ELOG_CLASSES="info warn error log qa"

For example, after merging the package www-misc/bluegriffon-bin-1.8 at 06:01:00 on 14 April 2016, I am able to examine the contents of the log file for that specific job:

$ cat /var/log/portage/elog/www-misc:bluegriffon-bin-1.8:20160414-060100.log
INFO: setup
Package: www-misc/bluegriffon-bin-1.8
Repository: local_overlay
USE: abi_x86_64 amd64 elibc_glibc kernel_linux userland_GNU
FEATURES: preserve-libs sandbox userpriv usersandbox
LOG: install
If you use BlueGriffon in KDE, use System Settings > Common Appearance and Behaviour > Application Appearance > GTK
and select any GTK theme other than Oyxgen, otherwise BlueGriffon will crash when you click on any pull-down menu.
QA: other
QA Notice: Pre-stripped files found:
/opt/bluegriffon/libreplace_jemalloc.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libnssdbm3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libnss3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/bluegriffon-bin
/opt/bluegriffon/libnssutil3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/gmp-clearkey/0.1/libclearkey.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libsmime3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libplc4.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libnssckbi.so
/opt/bluegriffon/plugin-container
/opt/bluegriffon/libsoftokn3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libssl3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libnspr4.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libxul.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libfreebl3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/components/libmozgnome.so
/opt/bluegriffon/components/libdbusservice.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libplds4.so
/opt/bluegriffon/libmozsqlite3.so
/opt/bluegriffon/bluegriffon

Of particular interest is the elog message:

If you use BlueGriffon in KDE, use System Settings > Common Appearance and Behaviour > Application Appearance > GTK
and select any GTK theme other than Oyxgen, otherwise BlueGriffon will crash when you click on any pull-down menu.

Clearly, some of the elog messages are important and must not be missed. After reading such messages, users can take appropriate action.

To facilitate reading Portage elog files, there is a GUI utility called Elogviewer which is easy to install and use:

# emerge elogviewer

$ elogviewer --help
usage: elogviewer [-h] [-p ELOGPATH] [--log {DEBUG,INFO,WARNING,ERROR}]

Elogviewer should help you not to miss important information. You need to
enable the elog feature by setting at least one of PORTAGE_ELOG_CLASSES="info
warn error log qa" and PORTAGE_ELOG_SYSTEM="save" in /etc/make.conf. You need
to add yourself to the portage group to use elogviewer without privileges.
Read /etc/make.conf.example for more information.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -p ELOGPATH, --elogpath ELOGPATH
                        path to the elog directory
  --log {DEBUG,INFO,WARNING,ERROR}
                        set logging level

I happen to have configured EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS="--jobs=8 --load-average=8" (i.e. perform installation jobs in parallel using all eight cores of the CPU) in my /etc/portage/make.conf file, so I don’t see elog messages on screen, and therefore Elogviewer comes in handy. The output in the Konsole window looks like the following when I merge a package:

# emerge -v bluegriffon-bin

These are the packages that would be merged, in order:

Calculating dependencies... done!
[ebuild   R   ~] www-misc/bluegriffon-bin-1.8::local_overlay  0 KiB

Total: 1 package (1 reinstall), Size of downloads: 0 KiB

>>> Verifying ebuild manifests
>>> Emerging (1 of 1) www-misc/bluegriffon-bin-1.8::local_overlay
>>> Installing (1 of 1) www-misc/bluegriffon-bin-1.8::local_overlay
>>> Jobs: 1 of 1 complete                           Load avg: 0.11, 0.07, 0.13
>>> Auto-cleaning packages...

>>> No outdated packages were found on your system.

 * GNU info directory index is up-to-date.

Notice that the important elog message regarding switching the GTK theme in KDE that is included in the log file was not displayed on the console during installation of the package, because of my setting for EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS.

If I then launch Elogviewer, either from the command line or using the KDE launcher, a window pops up as shown below. I can then view a list of recently merged packages and click on each to read the elog output easily. Whether installing only one package or many packages in one session, this makes life easier.

Elogviewer

Elogviewer window

Automatically detecting files placed in my Downloads directory in Gentoo Linux and scanning them for viruses

I have been using Linux for almost a decade and have never been unduly concerned about viruses on my machines running Linux. However, I do receive files from people who use Windows and Mac OS, and some of those files might contain Windows or Mac OS viruses, so, as a matter of courtesy and assistance to others, it would make some sense to scan those files before passing them on. Furthermore, as I use some Windows applications under WINE, it would also make sense to scan received files for Windows viruses if I am going to use those files with a Windows application running under WINE.

External files could get into my Gentoo Linux installations via pen drives, memory cards, optical discs, e-mails, my Dropbox directory and downloads from Web sites. In this post I am going to concentrate on the last of these. All the various e-mail account providers I use already scan e-mails for viruses on their e-mail servers before I even download e-mail into the e-mail client on my laptop (standard practice these days), so e-mail is not a particular worry.

I have had ClamAV and its GUI, ClamTk, installed for a long time. Whilst ClamTk can be used to schedule a daily update of virus signatures and a daily scan of one’s home directory by ClamAV, I normally run ClamTk and ClamAV ad hoc. However, I can see some benefit in launching ClamAV automatically when I download a file from the Internet, so I decided to do the following …

Automatically scan a file downloaded via a Web browser

I use Firefox to browse the Web, and had configured it to download files to the directory /home/fitzcarraldo/Downloads/. I decided to monitor automatically the Downloads directory for the addition of any file. As I use the ext4 file system, the method I opted to use is inotify, specifically the inotifywait command which is available once you install the package sys-fs/inotify-tools.

It is surprisingly easy to create a shell script to detect files downloaded into a directory. The following script, running continuously in a terminal, would detect any files created in my /home/fitzcarraldo/Downloads directory, scan the new files with ClamAV and display a report in the terminal window:

#!/bin/bash

echo
DIR=$HOME/Downloads

inotifywait -q -m -e create --format '%w%f' $DIR | while read FILE
do
     date
     echo "File $FILE has been detected. Scanning it for viruses now ..."
     clamscan $FILE
     echo
done

A usable script would need to be a bit more sophisticated than the one shown above, because an existing file in the directory could be overwritten by one with the same name, or opened and amended. Furthermore, the script above would need a permanently open terminal window. Therefore I created a script to run in the background and use a GUI dialogue tool to pop up a window with the virus scanner’s report when the script detects a new or changed file in the Downloads directory. As this laptop has KDE 4 installed I opted to use KDialog to display the pop-up window, but I could instead have used Zenity. The final script is shown below.

#!/bin/bash

DIR=$HOME/Downloads

# Get rid of old log file
rm $HOME/virus-scan.log 2> /dev/null

inotifywait -q -m -e close_write,moved_to --format '%w%f' $DIR | while read FILE
do
     # Have to check file length is nonzero otherwise commands may be repeated
     if [ -s $FILE ]; then
          date > $HOME/virus-scan.log
          clamscan $FILE >> $HOME/virus-scan.log
          kdialog --title "Virus scan of $FILE" --msgbox "$(cat $HOME/virus-scan.log)"
     fi
done

Now when I download a file in Firefox, a window pops up, displaying a message similar to the following:

Virus scan of /home/fitzcarraldo/Downloads/eicar_com.zip – KDialog

Fri 19 Feb 23:42:02 GMT 2016
/home/fitzcarraldo/Downloads/eicar_com.zip: Eicar-Test-Signature FOUND

———– SCAN SUMMARY ———–
Known viruses: 4259980
Engine version: 0.98.7
Scanned directories: 0
Scanned files: 1
Infected files: 1
Data scanned: 0.00 MB
Data read: 0.00 MB (ratio 0.00:1)
Time: 4.595 sec (0 m 4 s)

Notice in the above message that ClamAV detected a virus in a file eicar_com.zip that I downloaded from the European Expert Group for IT Security Web site (originally ‘European Institute for Computer Antivirus Research’). In fact the executable eicar.com does not contain a real virus; it was designed to contain a known signature that virus scanner creators and users can use in checking anti-virus software. You can find out more about the virus test files on the EICAR Web site.

Of course, if I use applications other than Firefox to download files, I need to make sure they download the files into the applicable directory so that the script can detect and scan the files:

fitzcarraldo@clevow230ss ~ $ cd Downloads/
fitzcarraldo@clevow230ss ~/Downloads $ youtube-dl -o Carnavalito.mp4 -f 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDUL3w7zFD4
ZDUL3w7zFD4: Downloading webpage
ZDUL3w7zFD4: Downloading video info webpage
ZDUL3w7zFD4: Extracting video information
ZDUL3w7zFD4: Downloading MPD manifest
[download] Destination: Carnavalito.mp4
[download] 100% of 16.61MiB in 00:05

So, now I have a shell script that pops up a window informing me whether or not any file I put in $HOME/Downloads/ contains a virus. But I would like the script to be launched automatically when I login to the Desktop Environment. Therefore, as I use KDE 4, I selected ‘System Settings’ > ‘Startup and Shutdown’ and, in the ‘Autostart’ pane, clicked on ‘Add Script…’ and entered the path to my shell script (I left ‘create as symlink’ ticked). Now, every time I use KDE, any file placed (automatically or manually) into $HOME/Downloads/ is scanned for viruses automatically and a window pops up giving the result.

As my laptop is not always connected to the Internet, I prefer to update the ClamAV virus signatures database manually, which I do either using the ClamTk GUI or via the command line using the freshclam command:

fitzcarraldo@clevow230ss ~ $ su
Password:
clevow230ss fitzcarraldo # freshclam
ClamAV update process started at Sat Feb 20 10:51:01 2016
WARNING: Your ClamAV installation is OUTDATED!
WARNING: Local version: 0.98.7 Recommended version: 0.99
DON'T PANIC! Read http://www.clamav.net/support/faq
main.cvd is up to date (version: 55, sigs: 2424225, f-level: 60, builder: neo)
Downloading daily-21375.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21376.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21377.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21378.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21379.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21380.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21381.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21382.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21383.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21384.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21385.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21386.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21387.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21388.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21389.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21390.cdiff [100%]
Downloading daily-21391.cdiff [100%]
daily.cld updated (version: 21391, sigs: 1850214, f-level: 63, builder: neo)
bytecode.cld is up to date (version: 271, sigs: 47, f-level: 63, builder: anvilleg)
Database updated (4274486 signatures) from db.UK.clamav.net (IP: 129.67.1.218)
WARNING: Clamd was NOT notified: Can't connect to clamd through /var/run/clamav/clamd.sock: No such file or directory

Stopping my laptop spontaneously resuming immediately after Suspend to RAM

If I selected ‘Suspend to RAM’ via the Desktop Environment in the Gentoo Linux installation on my Clevo W230SS laptop, the laptop did suspend but then immediately resumed automatically. The same thing happened if I suspended the laptop using either of the following commands from the command line:

root # pm-suspend

user $ qdbus org.kde.Solid.PowerManagement /org/freedesktop/PowerManagement Suspend

This behaviour was annoying, as it meant I had to shut down the laptop completely when I was not at my desk for a long time, rather than just being able to suspend the laptop.

Problem 1: USB devices

I usually have several USB devices connected to my laptop when I am at home or in the office, and I began to suspect that these USB connections were somehow causing Linux to resume as soon as it had suspended. Searching the Web turned up a Q&A page that seemed to confirm my suspicion: Why does my laptop resume immediately after suspend? I installed the utility acpitool mentioned on that Web page and used it with the ‘-w‘ option to check which wakeup-capable USB devices were currently enabled in my installation:

root # acpitool -w
   Device       S-state   Status   Sysfs node
  ---------------------------------------
  1. RP01         S4    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1c.0
  2. PXSX         S4    *disabled
  3. RP02         S4    *disabled
  4. PXSX         S4    *disabled
  5. RP03         S4    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1c.2
  6. PXSX         S4    *disabled  pci:0000:03:00.0
  7. RP04         S4    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1c.3
  8. PXSX         S4    *disabled  pci:0000:04:00.0
  9.            *disabled  platform:rtsx_pci_sdmmc.0
  10.           *disabled  platform:rtsx_pci_ms.0
  11. RLAN        S4    *disabled
  12. RP05        S4    *disabled
  13. PXSX        S4    *disabled
  14. RP06        S4    *disabled
  15. PXSX        S4    *disabled
  16. RP07        S4    *disabled
  17. PXSX        S4    *disabled
  18. RP08        S4    *disabled
  19. PXSX        S4    *disabled
  20. GLAN        S4    *disabled
  21. EHC1        S3    *enabled   pci:0000:00:1d.0
  22. EHC2        S3    *enabled   pci:0000:00:1a.0
  23. XHC         S3    *disabled  pci:0000:00:14.0
  24. HDEF        S4    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1b.0
  25. PEG0        S4    *disabled  pci:0000:00:01.0
  26. PEGP        S4    *disabled  pci:0000:01:00.0
  27. PEGA        S4    *disabled
  28. PWRB        S3    *enabled   platform:PNP0C0C:0
^C
root #

(I had to use Ctrl-C to get back to the command prompt.)

I then used the command ‘acpitool -W <device number>‘ on each of the three enabled devices (21, 22 and 28 above) in order to find out which of them needed to be disabled in order for my laptop to remain suspended when I suspended it. I found that I only needed to disable devices EHC1 (pci:0000:00:1d.0) and EHC2 (pci:0000:00:1a.0) to be able to suspend the laptop successfully:

root # acpitool -W 21 | grep 21
  Changed status for wakeup device #21 (EHC1)
  21. EHC1        S3    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1d.0
^C
root # acpitool -W 22 | grep 22
  Changed status for wakeup device #22 (EHC2)
  22. EHC2        S3    *disabled  pci:0000:00:1a.0
^C
root # pm-suspend

In this laptop these two devices are two internal USB root hubs:

user $ lsusb -t
/:  Bus 02.Port 1: Dev 1, Class=root_hub, Driver=ehci-pci/2p, 480M
    |__ Port 1: Dev 2, If 0, Class=Hub, Driver=hub/8p, 480M
        |__ Port 2: Dev 3, If 0, Class=Hub, Driver=hub/4p, 480M
            |__ Port 1: Dev 4, If 0, Class=Mass Storage, Driver=usb-storage, 480M
            |__ Port 3: Dev 5, If 0, Class=Mass Storage, Driver=usb-storage, 480M
/:  Bus 01.Port 1: Dev 1, Class=root_hub, Driver=ehci-pci/2p, 480M
    |__ Port 1: Dev 2, If 0, Class=Hub, Driver=hub/6p, 480M
        |__ Port 2: Dev 3, If 0, Class=Hub, Driver=hub/4p, 480M
            |__ Port 1: Dev 6, If 0, Class=Human Interface Device, Driver=usbhid, 1.5M
            |__ Port 4: Dev 7, If 0, Class=Human Interface Device, Driver=usbhid, 1.5M
            |__ Port 4: Dev 7, If 1, Class=Human Interface Device, Driver=usbhid, 1.5M
        |__ Port 3: Dev 4, If 0, Class=Wireless, Driver=btusb, 12M
        |__ Port 3: Dev 4, If 1, Class=Wireless, Driver=btusb, 12M
        |__ Port 4: Dev 5, If 0, Class=Video, Driver=uvcvideo, 480M
        |__ Port 4: Dev 5, If 1, Class=Video, Driver=uvcvideo, 480M

The next challenge was to find out how to disable and re-enable the two devices automatically when I suspend and resume the installation. Further searching of the Web turned up another Q&A page which pointed me in the right direction: How to run a script when suspending/resuming?. It turns out that you need to put a script of the following form in the directory /etc/pm/sleep.d/:

#!/bin/bash

case "$1" in
    suspend)
        # executed on suspend
        ;;
    resume) 
        # executed on resume
        ;;
    *)
        ;;
esac

If you want the script to run when hibernating and thawing, the tests would be for ‘hibernate‘ and ‘thaw‘ instead of ‘suspend‘ and ‘resume‘.

The thread [SOLVED] Computer immediately resumes after suspend in the KDE Forums almost gave me the solution I needed. I created a file /etc/pm/sleep.d/01-toggle-usb-hubs containing the following:

#!/bin/sh
#
username=fitzcarraldo
userhome=/home/$username
export XAUTHORITY="$userhome/.Xauthority"
export DISPLAY=":0"
#
case "$1" in
    suspend|hibernate)
        # Unbind ehci-pci for the device 0000:00:1a.0
        echo -n "0000:00:1a.0" | tee /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/unbind
        # Unbind ehci-pci for the device 0000:00:1d.0
        echo -n "0000:00:1d.0" | tee /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/unbind
    ;;
    resume|thaw)
        # Bind ehci-pci for the device 0000:00:1a.0
        echo -n "0000:00:1a.0" | tee /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/bind
        # Bind ehci-pci for the device 0000:00:1d.0
        echo -n "0000:00:1d.0" | tee /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/bind
    ;;
    *)
        exit $NA
    ;;
esac

I obtained the device details from the output of the ‘acpitools -w‘ command listed earlier and by looking in the directory /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci:

root # ls /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci
0000:00:1a.0  0000:00:1d.0  bind  new_id  remove_id  uevent  unbind

Notice that the script tests for either ‘suspend‘ or ‘hibernate‘ to disable the two devices, and tests for either ‘resume‘ or ‘thaw‘ to enable the two devices.

I made the script executable:

root # chmod +x /etc/pm/sleep.d/01-toggle-usb-hubs


Problem 2: Blank X Windows display due to NVIDIA closed-source driver bug

However, a problem remained: My laptop has an NVIDIA GPU and, when resuming from suspension, the X Windows display (Virtual Terminal 7) was a blank screen with only the mouse pointer visible. Now, it so happens that I also experience this behaviour if I switch from Virtual Terminal 7 to e.g. Virtual Terminal 1 (Ctrl-Alt-F1) and then switch back to Virtual Terminal 7 (Ctrl-Alt-F7). Apparently this is due to a bug in the closed-source NVIDIA driver (I am currently using Gentoo package x11-drivers/nvidia-drivers-358.16-r1). However, if I first disable compositing before switching to another virtual terminal, the X Windows display on Virtual Terminal 7 is still visible when I switch back to Virtual Terminal 7. It turns out there is a known bug in the NVIDIA closed-source driver, as explained in the following KDE bug report and thread in the NVIDIA CUDA ZONE Forums:

KDE Bugtracking System Bug No. 344326 – Black or corrupted screen on resume from suspend

NVIDIA CUDA ZONE Forums – Black screen on resume from suspend with 325.15 and KWin 4.11 with enabled compositing

As the suggested work-around is to disable compositing before suspending to RAM, I created a script /etc/pm/sleep.d/02-toggle-compositing containing the following:

#!/bin/sh
#
username=fitzcarraldo
userhome=/home/$username
export XAUTHORITY="$userhome/.Xauthority"
export DISPLAY=":0"
#
case "$1" in
    suspend|hibernate)
        su $username -c "qdbus org.kde.kwin /KWin toggleCompositing" &
    ;;
    resume|thaw)
        su $username -c "qdbus org.kde.kwin /KWin toggleCompositing" &
    ;;
    *)
        exit $NA
    ;;
esac

As I have KDE 4 on this laptop, I made the script use the command ‘qdbus org.kde.kwin /KWin toggleCompositing‘ to disable/enable compositing, so replace that command with the appropriate command if you are not using KDE 4.

I made the script executable:

root # chmod +x /etc/pm/sleep.d/02-toggle-compositing

Now both the scripts in the directory /etc/pm/sleep.d/ run when I suspend or resume the laptop, and everything works as expected. Mission accomplished!:-)

KDE Connect on a hotel Wi-Fi network

KDE Connect

I am a fan of KDE Connect (see my 2014 post about an earlier version), but had previously been unable to use it with a hotel network. However today I managed to do that, and here is how I did it …

I first connected my laptop and my Samsung Galaxy Note 4 to the hotel’s Wi-Fi network, then used the ifconfig command in Linux on my laptop to find the IP address of my laptop on the hotel’s network. Note that the IP address one sees if one uses a Web site such as WhatIsMyIPAddress will be the laptop’s outward-facing IP address, not the IP address of the laptop on the hotel network. For example, the ifconfig command has just shown me that my current DHCP-allocated IP address is 10.154.245.40 on this hotel’s network for this session whereas the Web site WhatIsMyIPAddress is showing my IP address as 78.100.57.102.

By the way, I can also use the excellent Android utility Fing on my Galaxy Note 4 to find the IP address of my laptop on the hotel’s network. It is quite interesting to use Fing to see what other devices (their hostname and IP address) are currently connected to the hotel’s network.

Anyway, then I launched KDE Connect on the Galaxy Note 4, tapped and ‘Add devices by IP’, and entered the laptop’s IP address (10.154.245.40 in this specific case). I was able to pair with KDE Connect running on my laptop and send files from my phone to the laptop, and vice versa.

Automatically log off inactive users in Windows 10

Although I use Linux on my own machines, the family PC in my lounge runs Windows 10. It has five user accounts and the other members of my family never bother to log out (‘sign out’ in Windows 10 parlance), usually leaving a browser window open. If I logged in to my account and clicked on my icon in the top left corner of the Start Menu, ‘Signed in’ was shown below any of the other users who had not bothered to log out. I found this behaviour somewhat frustrating and resolved to configure the PC to log out a user after a specified period of inactivity by that user. Although it is generally not recommended to forcibly logout someone in case e.g. they have a document open, in my family’s case it would be unlikely to cause a problem and is preferable to leaving several accounts unnecessarily active (albeit requiring each user to re-enter their password in order to access the account, as the default setting for ‘Require a password on wake-up’ is ‘Yes’). Below I explain how I configured Windows 10 to log out each user automatically after a period of inactivity.

First I downloaded the application idlelogoff.exe using the following link:

http://ftp.intelliadmin.com/release/idlelogoff.exe

See the Web page Automatically log off inactive users for details of that application.

I used the Windows 10 File Explorer to copy the file to the root directory C:\ and then I created a batch file IDLELOGOFF.BAT by right-clicking on the Windows 10 Start Menu icon, selecting ‘Command Prompt (Admin)’ and entering the following commands in the Command Prompt window:

cd C:\
notepad IDLELOGOFF.BAT

I made the contents of the batch file IDLELOGOFF.BAT the following, so that a user would be logged out automatically after 900 seconds of inactivity in their session:

start /min C:\idlelogoff.exe 900 logoff

and I changed the owner of the batch file to Users by right-clicking on it in File Explorer and then clicking ‘Properties’ > ‘Security’ > ‘Advanced’ > ‘Owner: Change’ and specifying ‘Users’.

Then I created a standard shortcut to the batch file for each user by getting each user in turn to log in to their account and following the instructions on the Web page Windows 10 – How to Run Program Automatically at Startup. Basically, you press the Windows Key and the R key simultaneously and enter ‘shell:startup‘ to open the user’s Start-up folder, and from there you right-click and select ‘New’ > ‘Shortcut’.

After that, the application idlelogoff.exe should be started automatically the next time a user logs in. You can check by pressing Ctrl-Alt-Delete in each user’s session, selecting ‘Task Manager’, clicking on the ‘Processes’ tab and idlelogoff.exe should be in the list of background processes. If you then log in to your own account and click on your account icon in the top left corner of the Start Menu, you’ll notice ‘Signed in’ is shown below the other user’s icon. If you check again after fifteen minutes, you’ll see that the ‘Signed in’ has gone, indicating that the user has been forcibly logged off.

NetworkManager: Failed to activate – The name org.freedesktop.NetworkManager was not provided by any .service files

Because I need to connect quickly and easily to numerous wired and wireless networks (DHCP or static IP addressing), I use NetworkManager in my Gentoo Linux amd64 installation running OpenRC and KDE 4. My Clevo W230SS laptop has an Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 Plus Bluetooth adapter card, and my installation uses the iwlwifi module:

# lspci -knn | grep Net -A2
03:00.0 Network controller [0280]: Intel Corporation Wireless 7260 [8086:08b1] (rev bb)
        Subsystem: Intel Corporation Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 [8086:4070]
        Kernel driver in use: iwlwifi
# lsmod | grep iwl
iwlmvm                143919  0
iwlwifi                75747  1 iwlmvm

As I am using NetworkManager instead of netifrc, in accordance with the instructions in the Gentoo Wiki article on NetworkManager I do not have any net.* services enabled (not even net.lo):

# rc-update show -v
       NetworkManager |      default                 
                acpid |                              
            alsasound |                              
         avahi-daemon |                              
       avahi-dnsconfd |                              
               binfmt | boot                         
            bluetooth |      default                 
             bootmisc | boot                         
         busybox-ntpd |                              
     busybox-watchdog |                              
                clamd |                              
          consolefont |                              
           consolekit |      default                 
               cronie |      default                 
         cups-browsed |      default                 
                cupsd |      default                 
                 dbus |      default                 
                devfs |                       sysinit
               dhcpcd |                              
                dhcpd |                              
             dhcrelay |                              
            dhcrelay6 |                              
                dmesg |                       sysinit
              dropbox |                              
           fancontrol |                              
                 fsck | boot                         
                 fuse |                              
           git-daemon |                              
                  gpm |                              
              hddtemp |                              
             hostname | boot                         
              hwclock | boot                         
            ip6tables |                              
             iptables |                              
              keymaps | boot                         
            killprocs |              shutdown        
    kmod-static-nodes |                       sysinit
           lm_sensors |                              
                local |      default                 
           localmount | boot                         
             loopback | boot                         
      mit-krb5kadmind |                              
          mit-krb5kdc |                              
       mit-krb5kpropd |                              
              modules | boot                         
             mount-ro |              shutdown        
                 mtab | boot                         
                mysql |                              
                  nas |                              
         net.enp4s0f1 |                              
               net.lo |                              
             netmount |      default                 
           ntp-client |                              
                 ntpd |                              
           nullmailer |                              
              numlock |                              
  nvidia-persistenced |                              
           nvidia-smi |                              
              osclock |                              
              pciparm |                              
               procfs | boot                         
              pwcheck |                              
            pydoc-2.7 |                              
            pydoc-3.4 |                              
               rfcomm |                              
                 root | boot                         
               rsyncd |                              
            s6-svscan |                              
                samba |      default                 
                saned |                              
            saslauthd |                              
            savecache |              shutdown        
                 sntp |                              
                 sshd |      default                 
             svnserve |                              
                 swap | boot                         
            swapfiles | boot                         
              swclock |                              
               sysctl | boot                         
                sysfs |                       sysinit
            syslog-ng |      default                 
        teamviewerd10 |                              
         termencoding | boot                         
             timidity |                              
         tmpfiles.dev |                       sysinit
       tmpfiles.setup | boot                         
               twistd |                              
                 udev |                       sysinit
                  ufw | boot                         
              urandom | boot                         
       wpa_supplicant |                              
                  xdm |      default                 
            xdm-setup |

I have left the netmount service enabled in case I want to use network-attached file shares at home or in one of the various office locations where I work.

Networking works fine on my laptop with the many wired and wireless networks I have used except for one particular public wireless network (it is in an airport, has multiple Access Points, and its Access Points only support 802.11a/b/g, which may or may not be relevant) for which the following message would usually appear in a pop-up window when I tried to connect to the network from the KDE network management GUI after start-up:

Failed to activate
The name org.freedesktop.NetworkManager was not provided by any .service files

Error message displayed by KDE when trying to connect to one specific network

Error message displayed by KDE when trying to connect to one specific network


This occurred with both networkmanager-1.0.2-r1 and networkmanager-1.0.6, the two Stable Branch releases of NetworkManager currently available in Gentoo Linux.

The wireless network is not the only network at that particular location, and the ‘Failed to activate’ message occurred whichever network (wireless or wired) I tried to access at that location. When this problem occurred, it transpired that the NetworkManager service was not running (it had crashed):

$ nmcli d
Error: NetworkManager is not running.
$ rc-status
Runlevel: default
 dbus                   [  started  ]
 NetworkManager         [  crashed  ]
 netmount               [  started  ]
 syslog-ng              [  started  ]
 cupsd                  [  started  ]
 samba                  [  crashed  ]
 consolekit             [  started  ]
 cronie                 [  started  ]
 bluetooth              [  started  ]
 xdm                    [  started  ]
 cups-browsed           [  started  ]
 sshd                   [  started  ]
 local                  [  started  ]
Dynamic Runlevel: hotplugged
Dynamic Runlevel: needed
 xdm-setup              [  started  ]
 avahi-daemon           [  started  ]
Dynamic Runlevel: manual

(I am not bothered that Samba crashes in that particular location. It crashes even if a connection is established, because the public wireless network does not provide network file systems. Samba works fine when I connect the laptop to an office network or to my home network.)

Even if the ‘Failed to activate’ message occurred, sometimes (but not always) the laptop could still connect to networks after I restarted the NetworkManager service (albeit sometimes it was necessary to restart it more than once):

# /etc/init.d/NetworkManager restart

When it is possible to connect to networks, the NetworkManager service is of course running:

$ nmcli d
DEVICE    TYPE      STATE        CONNECTION           
sit0      sit       connected    sit0                 
wlp3s0    wifi      connected    Free_Airport_Internet
enp4s0f1  ethernet  unavailable  --                   
lo        loopback  unmanaged    --        
$ rc-status
Runlevel: default
 dbus                   [  started  ]
 NetworkManager         [  started  ]
 netmount               [  started  ]
 syslog-ng              [  started  ]
 cupsd                  [  started  ]
 samba                  [  crashed  ]
 consolekit             [  started  ]
 cronie                 [  started  ]
 bluetooth              [  started  ]
 xdm                    [  started  ]
 cups-browsed           [  started  ]
 sshd                   [  started  ]
 local                  [  started  ]
Dynamic Runlevel: hotplugged
Dynamic Runlevel: needed
 xdm-setup              [  started  ]
 avahi-daemon           [  started  ]
Dynamic Runlevel: manual

I searched the Web for the error message and, based on a recommendation on the Web page ‘nm-applet gives errors‘ claiming the problem is due to the iwlwifi driver when used with an Intel 7260 controller, I created a file /etc/modprobe.d/iwlwifi.conf containing the following line, and rebooted:

options iwlwifi power_save=0

However, the error message still occurred. So I changed the iwlwifi module options line to the following, as also recommended on that page, and rebooted:

options iwlwifi 11n_disable=1 power_save=0

However, the error message still occurred.

The default value for OpenRC’s rc_depend_strict variable is YES if rc_depend_strict is not declared in the file /etc/rc.conf, but I do not think that is the cause of the problem:

# Do we allow any started service in the runlevel to satisfy the dependency
# or do we want all of them regardless of state? For example, if net.eth0
# and net.eth1 are in the default runlevel then with rc_depend_strict="NO"
# both will be started, but services that depend on 'net' will work if either
# one comes up. With rc_depend_strict="YES" we would require them both to
# come up.
#rc_depend_strict="YES"

As already mentioned, sometimes just restarting the NetworkManager service once or more did enable the laptop to connect to the network. This made me wonder whether the problem had something to do either with the timing of the launch of the NetworkManager service or with the timing of the service establishing a connection. As netmount is the only other network-related service enabled at start-up, I checked the netmount service’s configuration file /etc/conf.d/netmount to see what it contained (it’s the same in both the latest stable openrc-0.17 and the latest testing openrc-0.18.2):

# You will need to set the dependencies in the netmount script to match
# the network configuration tools you are using. This should be done in
# this file by following the examples below, and not by changing the
# service script itself.
#
# Each of these examples is meant to be used separately. So, for
# example, do not set rc_need to something like "net.eth0 dhcpcd".
#
# If you are using newnet and configuring your interfaces with static
# addresses with the network script, you  should use this setting.
#
#rc_need="network"
#
# If you are using oldnet, you must list the specific net.* services you
# need.
#
# This example assumes all of your netmounts can be reached on
# eth0.
#
#rc_need="net.eth0"
#
# This example assumes some of your netmounts are on eth1 and some
# are on eth2.
#
#rc_need="net.eth1 net.eth2"
#
# If you are using a dynamic network management tool like
# networkmanager, dhcpcd in standalone mode, wicd, badvpn-ncd, etc, to
# manage the network interfaces with the routes to your netmounts, you
# should list that tool.
#
#rc_need="networkmanager"
#rc_need="dhcpcd"
#rc_need="wicd"
#
# The default setting is designed to be backward compatible with our
# current setup, but you are highly discouraged from using this. In
# other words, please change it to be more suited to your system.
#
rc_need="net"

As I am using NetworkManager rather than netifrc, I followed the instructions in the file’s comments and changed the file’s contents from:

rc_need="net"

to:

rc_need="networkmanager"

After making the above change, the console messages at boot-up included a new message:

* ERROR: netmount needs service(s) networkmanager

That message made sense: rc_need had been set to "networkmanager" and, obviously, netmount can only do its job if NetworkManager is running (AND a network connection has been established). However, notice that the name of the NetworkManager service initscript is /etc/init.d/NetworkManager, not /etc/init.d/networkmanager. In other words, the instructions in /etc/conf.d/netmount are wrong: the name of the service is actually ‘NetworkManager‘, not ‘networkmanager‘. So I changed /etc/conf.d/netmount to contain rc_need="NetworkManager" instead of rc_need="networkmanager" and, unsurprisingly, the above-mentioned error message no longer occurs. I have filed Gentoo Bugzilla Bug Report No. 564846 requesting that the comment in the configuration file be changed.

Nevertheless, the ‘Failed to activate’ message still occurred when I tried to connect to any network at that location by using the DE’s network management GUI, and therefore I still needed to restart the NetworkManager service manually in order to be able to connect to any network there. Although I am not yet sure of the root cause and solution, I have found a work-around which avoids me having to manually restart the NetworkManager service, as explained below.

Although OpenRC correctly launches the NetworkManager service, that service remains inactive until it actually establishes a network connection. This is not a bug, it is the way OpenRC and NetworkManager work (see the explanation in the Gentoo Forums thread NetworkManager has started, but is inactive). This is why the following console message appears during boot-up:

* WARNING: NetworkManager has already started, but is inactive

If you did not configure NetworkManager to connect automatically to a network, after logging-in to the DE you will need to use the DE’s network management GUI (plasma-nm in the case if KDE, nm-applet in the case of e.g. Xfce) to tell NetworkManager to connect to the desired network. However, I found that waiting that long before trying to connect is too late to avoid the ‘Failed to activate’ problem, i.e. NetworkManager crashes after a while. I do not know why this happens, but it usually happens only when I am at the location covered by one specific wireless network (which is why I wonder if the problem is a result of that network only supporting 802.11a/b/g). By configuring NetworkManager to connect automatically to the wireless network which seemed to trigger the problem, the NetworkManager service tries to connect earlier. It is possible to configure NetworkManager to do this either by using the DE network GUI and ticking ‘Automatically connect to this network when it is available’ for the relevant network connection, or by directly editing the relevant connection’s file in the directory /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/.

Of the various wired and wireless connections I had configured on the laptop, I had named the problematic wireless network’s connection ‘Free_Airport_Internet’. So I edited the file /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/Free_Airport_Internet and deleted the line ‘autoconnect=false‘ in the [connections] section of the file (the default value of the autoconnect variable is TRUE – see man nm-settings). I could instead have done this by using the DE’s network manager GUI and ticking ‘Automatically connect to this network when it is available’ for that network connection. Now, when the laptop boots, NetworkManager tries to connect to that network and the ‘Failed to activate’ problem is avoided. This works with or without the iwlwifi driver options I mentioned above, so, despite the claim on the Web page I referenced above, the root cause of the problem does not appear to be the iwlwifi driver. What I don’t understand is why the problem only seems to occur with one particular network (a public wireless network which happens to only support 802.11a/b/g), i.e. even if none of the NetworkManager connection files in my installation have been configured to try to establish a connection automatically, with all the other wireless networks I have used in other locations (I believe those all support at least 802.11a/b/g/n) I have been able to establish a connection manually by using the DE’s network management GUI.

The bottom line

If your installation uses NetworkManager and you experience the ‘Failed to activate’ message when trying to connect to networks from the DE’s network management GUI, check if the NetworkManager service is running. You can check by using the command ‘nmcli d‘ in a console. If it is not running, try to restart the NetworkManager service from the command line. If the connection is not already configured to start automatically, configure it to start automatically in order to try to make NetworkManager become active at an early stage.

POSTSCRIPT (November 6, 2015)

The two links below are to old bug reports regarding earlier versions of NetworkManager having trouble using wireless networks with multiple Access Points. I wonder if the problem I saw with NetworkManager crashing when not configured to connect automatically to the specific network I mentioned above is somehow related to those problems:

background scanning causes drivers to disassociate – WiFi roaming causes NetworkManager to lose routing

network-manager roams to (none) ((none)) – background scanning

Roaming to BSSID “(none)” certainly happens with this particular network too, as shown by the messages in the laptop’s system log from yesterday when I was using the laptop with that network (the laptop was stationary the whole time):

# cat /var/log/messages | grep "Nov  5 11" | grep NetworkManager | grep \(none\)
Nov  5 11:01:22 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID 04:C5:A4:C3:F9:EE (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:01:22 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet)
Nov  5 11:13:23 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:13:23 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to 04:C5:A4:C3:F9:EE (Free_Airport_Internet)
Nov  5 11:15:23 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID 04:C5:A4:C3:F9:EE (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:15:23 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet)
Nov  5 11:19:22 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:19:23 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet)
Nov  5 11:49:50 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:49:50 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to 68:BC:0C:A1:3C:DE (Free_Airport_Internet)
Nov  5 11:51:51 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID 68:BC:0C:A1:3C:DE (Free_Airport_Internet) to (none) ((none))
Nov  5 11:51:51 clevow230ss NetworkManager[2459]:   (wlp3s0): roamed from BSSID (none) ((none)) to B8:BE:BF:69:89:6E (Free_Airport_Internet)

Today I’m using a hotel network in my hotel room, and that does not roam to BSSID “(none)”, but I don’t know if my room is within range of more than one Access Point:

# cat /var/log/messages | grep "Nov  6" | grep NetworkManager | grep \(none\)
#

Anyway, with the work-around described in this post I have not had any further trouble accessing the particular network, but it would be interesting to know the root cause.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 70 other followers