Review of an MT-ViKI 2-port automatic KVM switch

Three years ago I bought a two-port KVM (keyboard, video and mouse) switch with the intention of using it to connect my keyboard and monitor to my headless server to investigate a boot-up problem. But I found the cause of the problem quickly and never needed to use the KVM switch, which was sitting on a shelf ever since.

Recently I bought a cheap second-hand desktop machine for another project and, rather than having a second keyboard, mouse and monitor on my desk, I decided to use the spare KVM switch.

Schematic diagram of connections to MT-261KL KVM switch

Schematic diagram of connections to MT-261KL KVM switch.

The KVM switch was manufactured by MT-ViKI Electronic Technology Co., Ltd, a Chinese company that manufactures a range of KVM switches. The model I bought is the MT-261KL-FBA AUTO KVM USB+AUDIO. It has two DE-15 input ports for connection to two computers using the custom cables provided, a DE-15 VGA output port, an audio Line-Out port, a Microphone port and three USB 2.0 ports. Two cables with pigtails were supplied with the switch. At one end of each cable there is a DE-15 (VGA) plug, a pigtail with a USB Type-A plug, a pigtail with a 3.5 mm Line-In plug and a pigtail with a 3.5 mm Microphone plug. All these are for connection to the computer. At the other end of each cable is a DE-15 plug, which is for connection to one of the DE-15 ports labelled PC1 and PC2 on the KVM switch. Video, audio and USB signals are all transferred via this DE-15 plug at the KVM switch end. The device does not require an external power supply unit, so I assume it is powered from either of the two computers’ USB ports.

The two custom cables supplied with the MT-261KL KVM switch

The two custom cables supplied with the MT-261KL KVM switch.

MT-261KL KVM switch with cables connected

MT-261KL KVM switch with cables connected.

Left end of MT-261KL KVM switch with audio sockets

Left end of MT-261KL KVM switch with audio sockets.

VGA, USB, Line Out and Mic plugs of MT-261KL custom cable connected to desktop

VGA, USB, Line Out and Mic plugs of MT-261KL custom cable connected to desktop.

VGA, USB, Line Out and Mic plugs of MT-261KL custom cable connected to laptop

VGA, USB, Line Out and Mic plugs of MT-261KL custom cable connected to laptop.

My USB keyboard and USB mouse are plugged into two of the three USB ports on the KVM switch. I can switch them and the monitor between the two computers either by pressing a push-button on top of the KVM switch or by pressing specific keyboard keys in sequence within 2 seconds of each other:

  • Scroll Lock + Scroll Lock + 1 (or 2) to select PC port directly
  • Scroll Lock + Scroll Lock + Down Arrow to select Next Port
  • Scroll Lock + Scroll Lock + Up Arrow to select Previous Port
  • Scroll Lock + Scroll Lock + S to select Auto Scan
  • Scroll Lock + Scroll Lock + B to toggle Beep On/Off
  • ESC to exit Auto Scan mode

Two LEDs on the KVM switch are used to indicate which computer is currently connected to the keyboard, monitor and mouse. The loud beep that the switch emits when switching from one computer to the other can be disabled if desired.

This switch supports monitor resolutions up to 2048 x 1536, and I’m using 1920 x 1080 in both OSs. Any monitor that supports a VGA connection should work. My monitor happens to be a 23-inch ViewSonic VX2363SMHL which has both VGA and HDMI sockets and cables. Any USB keyboard and mouse should work; I’m using an HP K45 keyboard and a Logitech M90 mouse. My laptop runs Gentoo Linux and the desktop runs Windows 10, and the switch works fine with both machines.

Although the custom cables between the KVM switch and the computers are quite bulky and stiff, I managed to connect everything to the KVM switch with it in a convenient position on my desk. Selecting the computer from the keyboard instead of the push-button on the KVM switch is easier, though. There is somewhat of a ‘cable spaghetti’ on my desk due to all the cables, but I have arranged them as tidily as possible. The audio sockets on my laptop are on the opposite side of the laptop to the VGA socket, which does not help. Fortunately the audio jack plug cables that branch out of the custom cable are just long enough to reach the Headphone and Mic sockets on the laptop.

There is a third USB port on the KVM switch, that I am not using. It would be possible to use this third USB port to connect another USB device (a printer, for example) that could be switched between the two computers. As there is only one USB connection to each computer, the KVM switch must be acting as a USB hub.

I have not yet connected an external microphone to the KVM switch, but I do have my external stereo powered speakers connected to it. The audio from the external speakers connected via the switch is still OK, although some noise is being picked up from all the cables on and under my desk. But I believe that is as much to do with the long thin unshielded audio cable from the powered speakers (Logitech X-140 Multimedia speakers, not of high quality). I suspect a shorter, shielded cable would perform much better.

Anyway, if you ever need a KVM switch that supports a monitor with a VGA port, this model is reasonable. MT-ViKI also make switches that can switch a keyboard, monitor and mouse between more than two computers, and switches with HDMI ports if you want to switch a keyboard, monitor and mouse between computers that do not have VGA ports. By the way, I have no association with the company.