Another look at beeps in Linux

Following my previous post I experimented further with the Linux Kernel configuration options for event beeps (sometimes called ‘system beeps’), and I now have a better understanding of how the Kernel options interact (on one of my laptops, at least).

The sound card in my Clevo W230SS laptop has a VIA VT1802S audio codec chip. I looked at the audio circuit schematic in the service manual; one of the digital input pins on the VT1802S is labelled ‘PCBEEP’, and one of its analogue output pins is labelled ‘PCBEEP’ and is connected to the laptop’s speaker circuit. So there is no PC Speaker in this laptop and it emulates the PC Speaker via the laptop’s sound card, as mentioned in my previous post.

Before I describe my latest results, there are a couple of influencing factors I forgot to mention in my previous post:

  • In some computers the BIOS Menu has one or more options for enabling/disabling beeps. The BIOS menu of my Clevo laptop does not have an option to enable/disable all beeps from the (emulated) PC Speaker, but it does have a couple of options to enable/disable ‘Power On Boot Beep’ and ‘Battery Low Alarm Beep’ (I have disabled them both). Anyway, if you are still not getting beeps after trying everything else, be sure to check the BIOS menu just in case it has an option to enable/disable the PC Speaker.

  • Make sure that bell-style is not set to ‘none‘ (you could set it to ‘audible‘ if you wanted to be sure):

    root # grep bell /etc/inputrc
    # do not bell on tab-completion
    #set bell-style none

The Kernel configuration was initially as shown below. With this configuration no beeps were emitted in a VT (Virtual Terminal) or in an X Windows terminal. As explained in my previous post, I therefore configured the XKB Event Daemon to play an audio file (bell.oga) whenever X Windows detects a BEL character (ASCII 007) or Backspace key (ASCII 008).

root # grep PCSP /usr/src/linux/.config
CONFIG_HAVE_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
CONFIG_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
# CONFIG_INPUT_PCSPKR is not set
# CONFIG_SND_PCSP is not set
root # grep BEEP /usr/src/linux/.config
CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP_MODE=1

Then I rebuilt the Kernel with CONFIG_INPUT_PCSPKR=M and CONFIG_SND_PCSP=M:

root # cd /usr/src/linux
root # mount /dev/sda1 /boot
root # make menuconfig
root # make && make modules_install
root # make install
root # grep PCSP /usr/src/linux/.config
CONFIG_HAVE_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
CONFIG_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
CONFIG_INPUT_PCSPKR=m
CONFIG_SND_PCSP=m
root # grep BEEP /usr/src/linux/.config
CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP_MODE=1

Then I created the file /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf in order to blacklist the modules pcspkr and snd-pcsp so that only I could load them after boot:

root # cat /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
blacklist pcspkr
blacklist snd-pcsp

Then I added the line ‘options snd-pcsp index=2‘ to the file /etc/modprobe.d/alsa.conf so that the virtual sound card pcsp would not become the default sound card:

root # tail /etc/modprobe.d/alsa.conf
alias /dev/midi snd-seq-oss

# Set this to the correct number of cards.
options snd cards_limit=1

# See https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/alsa-driver/+bug/1313904
options snd-hda-intel patch=,clevo-hda-patch

# See Kernel Help text for CONFIG_SND_PCSP
options snd-pcsp index=2

Then I rebooted and checked that neither module was loaded:

root # lsmod | grep pcsp
root # echo -e '\a'

root #

As neither module was loaded, the situation was the same as before: a) no beep in a VT; b) no beep in Konsole/Yakuake (I will ignore KDE terminal programs anyway because of KDE bug report no. 177861);* c) the same bell.oga beep in xterm due to my use of xkbevd; d) no changes in ALSA Mixer.

* Regarding Konsole and Yakuake, see my update of October 9, 2016 at the bottom of this post.

Then I loaded the module pcspkr:

root # modprobe pcspkr
root # lsmod | grep pcsp
pcspkr                  1875  0
root # echo -e '\a'

root #

There were no changes in ALSA Mixer. But now the BEL character and Backspace in a VT did result in a beep (I’ll call this a ‘pcbeep’ to distinguish it from the different-sounding beep produced using bell.oga). There was the usual bell.oga beep in xterm due to my use of xkbevd. If I stopped xkbevd, there was no pcbeep in X Windows from the shell commands shown in my previous post, although the following commands from any terminal in X Windows (even Konsole/Yakuake) did emit a pcbeep:

user $ sudo sh -c "echo -e '\a' > /dev/console"

user $ sudo sh -c "tput bel > /dev/console"

root # echo -e '\a' > /dev/console

root # tput bel > /dev/console

Then I unloaded the module pcspkr and loaded the module snd-pcsp:

root # modprobe -r pcspkr
root # modprobe snd-pcsp
root # lsmod | grep pcsp
snd_pcsp                7918  1
root # echo -e '\a'

root #

ALSA Mixer showed a new sound card named ‘pcsp‘ (Sound Card 2) with three channels: ‘Master’, ‘Beep’ and ‘BaseFRQ’. I could mute/unmute ‘Beep’ by pressing ‘M’ on the keyboard as usual, and I could toggle ‘BaseFRQ’ between two values:18643 and 37286. The BEL character and Backspace in a VT resulted in a pcbeep. There was the usual bell.oga beep in xterm due to my use of xkbevd. If I stopped xkbevd, there was no pcbeep in X Windows from the shell commands shown in my previous post, although the following commands from any terminal in X Windows (even Konsole/Yakuake) did emit a pcbeep:

user $ sudo sh -c "echo -e '\a' > /dev/console"

user $ sudo sh -c "tput bel > /dev/console"

root # echo -e '\a' > /dev/console

root # tput bel > /dev/console

Muting ‘Beep’ in ALSA Mixer did not mute the bell.oga beeps in X Windows, but it did mute the pcbeeps in the VTs.

Unlike the situation with the pcspkr module, occasionally there were brief low-volume crackles and pops from the laptop’s speakers.

So both drivers worked, but pcspkr performed better, although it could not be muted via ALSA Mixer. My recommendation to use pcspkr rather than snd-pcsp still stands.

Unlike pcspkr, I had to force the unloading of snd-pcsp:

root # modprobe -r snd-pcsp
modprobe: FATAL: Module snd_pcsp is in use.
root # rmmod -f snd_pcsp
root #

I then removed the Kernel’s ‘digital beep’ interface for the Intel HDA driver by rebuilding the Kernel with CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP=N:

root # cd /usr/src/linux
root # mount /dev/sda1 /boot
root # make menuconfig
root # make && make modules_install
root # make install
root # grep PCSP /usr/src/linux/.config
CONFIG_HAVE_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
CONFIG_PCSPKR_PLATFORM=y
CONFIG_INPUT_PCSPKR=m
CONFIG_SND_PCSP=m
root # grep BEEP /usr/src/linux/.config
# CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP is not set
root #

After I rebooted, the behaviour was exactly the same as for CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP=Y and CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP_MODE=1.

So, there you have it. I believe my previous post was essentially correct regarding the functional design of the Kernel options. If you have a computer without a PC Speaker but it emulates one via the computer’s sound card, you have to set either CONFIG_INPUT_PCSPKR or CONFIG_SND_PCSP to get a beep in a VT, not set just CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP and CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP_MODE. However, even when my laptop emits beeps in a VT from the (emulated) PC Speaker, no beeps from the (emulated) PC Speaker are emitted in X Windows unless the user is the root user and the output is redirected to /dev/console. So, if you want to emit beeps in X Windows it is still better in my opinion to use xkbevd to play an audio file of a beep, as described in my previous post.

Update (October 9, 2016): Regarding KDE’s terminal applications emitting beeps, I am currently using KDE Plasma 5.7.5 and have been able to configure Konsole and Yakuake to play an audio file of a beep (as opposed to emitting a pcbeep) as follows:

  • In Konsole, click on ‘Settings’ > ‘Configure Notifications…’, select ‘Bell in Visible Session’ and ensure ‘Play a sound’ is ticked and a file is specified there (I specify /usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/bell.oga). If you wish, do the same for ‘Bell in Non-Visible Session’.
  • For Yakuake, press F12 to display the Yakuake window, click on the ‘Open Menu’ icon, select ‘Configure Notifications…’, select ‘Bell in Visible Session’ and ensure ‘Play a sound’ is ticked and a file is specified there (I specify /usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/bell.oga). If you wish, do the same for ‘Bell in Non-Visible Session’.

About Fitzcarraldo
A Linux user with an interest in all things technical.

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