KDE Connect – Link your Android device to your KDE desktop

KDE Connect app icon on my Samsung Galaxy Note II

KDE Connect app icon on my Samsung Galaxy Note II

KDE Connect is a nice tool that links your Android phone or tablet seamlessly via WiFi to KDE on your PC (the latter can be connected via WiFi or cable to the network). It allows your KDE desktop to receive notifications, files and media player commands from your Android device. The available KDE Connect plug-ins are:

Battery report
Periodically report battery status

Clipboard sync
Share the clipboard content

Multimedia remote controls
Control audio/video from your phone
(pause; first track; previous track; next track; last track; change volume)

Notification sync
Access your notification from other devices

Ping
Send and receive pings

Telephony notifier
Send notifications from SMS and calls

You will need to install the Android KDE Connect application on your Android device, and the Linux KDE Connect application on your PC.

Install the KDE Connect app on your Android device from the Google Play Store. You will then see the KDE Connect icon on the apps screen of your Android device.

For Gentoo users an ebuild for KDE Connect is available in the Gentoo KDE team’s testing overlay, so here are the instructions on how to install KDE Connect on your PC from there.

Firstly, mask the KDE overlay so that none of the packages in it interferes with the KDE software you installed from the main Portage tree:

# echo "*/*::kde" >> /etc/portage/package.mask

Then unmask the KDE Connect package in the KDE overlay:

# echo "kde-misc/kdeconnect" >> /etc/portage/package.unmask

N.B. If /etc/portage/package.mask is a directory rather than a file (either is possible) in your installation, and if /etc/portage/package.unmask is a directory rather than a file (either is possible) in your installation, use the following commands instead of the above two commands:

# echo "*/*::kde" > /etc/portage/package.mask/kde_overlay
# echo "kde-misc/kdeconnect" > /etc/portage/package.unmask/kdeconnect

Now add the KDE overlay and merge the package:

# layman -a kde
# emerge kdeconnect

If a firewall is running on your PC, you will need to configure it to allow tcp and udp traffic via a specific range of ports (1714 to 1764). I have UFW running on my main laptop, so in my case I used the following commands:

# ufw allow proto tcp to any port 1714:1764
# ufw allow proto udp to any port 1714:1764

The rules should look like this:

# ufw status verbose | grep 1714
1714:1764/tcp ALLOW IN Anywhere
1714:1764/udp ALLOW IN Anywhere
1714:1764/tcp ALLOW IN Anywhere (v6)
1714:1764/udp ALLOW IN Anywhere (v6)

If you have the KConfig Module kcm_ufw installed on your PC then you can instead use System Settings > Firewall to add the UFW rules via the KDE GUI.

By the way, to check which KConfig modules are installed on your PC you can use the following command under your user account:

$ kcmshell4 --list

Using KDE Connect is not difficult, so I will leave you to play with it. Obviously make sure WiFi is enabled on your Android device, and that it and your PC are connected to the same network. Tap on the KDE Connect icon on your Android device to launch the app, and you should see your PC’s name listed under CONNECTED DEVICES. Tap on the PC name and you should see the following screen:

KDE Connect screen

KDE Connect screen

If you tap on ‘Send ping’, the KDE Notification widget on the KDE System Tray should pop up a notification.

You can see what KDE Connect plug-ins are available, and select/deselect them:

KDE Connect plugins

KDE Connect plugins

KDE Connect also enables you to use your Android device as a remote control for media players running on your PC. When you launch a media player in KDE its name will appear in a list of selectable players in KDE Connect, and the name of the track currently playing will also be displayed:

KDE Connect - Remote control

KDE Connect - Remote control

When you select a file on your Android device and tap the Share icon, KDE Connect will be one of the options displayed on the ‘Share via’ menu. This is a handy way to send files from your Android device to your PC. The KDE Notification widget on your PC will notify you when the file has been transferred to ~/Desktop/ on your PC:

KDE on your PC notifies you when a file has been sent via KDE Connect

KDE on your PC notifies you a file has been sent via KDE Connect

You should also get notifications on your KDE desktop when someone phones or sends you an SMS.

Kudos and many thanks to the people responsible for KDE Connect. KDE is already a superb desktop environment, and with the addition of KDE Connect it is better still.

AirDroid, a handy Android app for managing your phone from Linux

AirDroid

In a previous article I explained how I installed and used the Windows application MyPhoneExplorer in WINE to manage the phone book (contacts list) in my HTC Desire mobile phone. Well, today I found out about AirDroid, a clever and useful Android application that can do the same thing, as well as the other tasks that MyPhoneExplorer can do, such as transfer files between my laptop and my phone, typing SMS on the laptop to send from the phone, and so on.

Last week I bought a Samsung Galaxy Note II and I needed to transfer a lot of large PDF files from my laptop to the new phone. Now, with my HTC Desire I could simply connect the phone to my laptop with a USB cable, mount the phone in KDE as a storage device, and drag the files across from one Dolphin file manager window to another. But the Samsung phone uses MTP for file transfers and, when the phone is connected to my laptop with a USB cable I can browse the phone’s file directories in Dolphin, but I cannot copy files from the laptop to the phone. Applications that use MTP for file transfer do exist for Windows and OS X (in fact Samsung provides Kies for this purpose), but my laptop runs Linux. I had not got around to installing the latest version (1.8.4) of MyPhoneExplorer to check if it works with the HTC Desire, let alone with a Samsung phone. So I searched the Web to see if there was a Linux application that uses MTP for general file transfer (i.e. not one of the dedicated music players in Linux that do support MTP for transferring music files only).

And that is how I learned about AirDroid, which allows you to “wirelessly manage your Android from your favourite browser.” The AirDroid Web site and the Android Play Store page for AirDroid explain the features of the application and both have a video showing it in operation.

From the AirDroid Web site:

What is AirDroid?

AirDroid is a fast, free app that lets you wirelessly manage & control your Android devices (phone & tablet) from a web browser. It’s designed with the vision to bridge the gap between your Android device and web browser, on desktop computers or tablet devices, on Windows, Mac/iOS, or Linux.

What can I do with AirDroid?

You can use AirDroid to send/receive SMS (text messages, if supported by the device), install/uninstall apps, transfer files between Android device and computer/tablet, and manage contacts, photos, music, videos, and ringtones, etc., all in a web browser. Install AirDroid on your Android device and open your favorite web browser to experience it yourself.

I immediately used Play Store on my phone to install AirDroid. I launched AirDroid, launched Firefox on my laptop and opened http://web.airdroid.com/, and was able to connect the laptop and phone quickly and easily. I block-selected the eighty files in the Dolphin window that I wanted to copy to the phone and dragged them to the phone’s Download directory window in the Firefox window. One by one the files were copied to the phone, with a little progress bar against each one. However, for some reason a few of the files were not copied so I dragged those across individually after the copying of the others had completed.

AirDroid in Firefox on my laptop

AirDroid in Firefox on my laptop

The above snapshot of my laptop’s screen shows the AirDroid desktop inside the maximised Firefox window. The window with the yellow folder icons inside it is actually an AirDroid window which I opened by clicking on the blue folder named ‘Files’ on the left side of the AirDroid desktop. These windows can be dragged around the AirDroid desktop in the browser window, and can even be resized.

A connection problem, and a solution

When I tried to connect the phone and laptop again later, an error message was displayed in the browser window on the laptop:

Failed to connect. Make sure your device is connected to a same WiFi network.

I was sure that the two devices were on the same WiFi network but, no matter what I tried, I could not get the laptop and phone to connect again. I looked through the AirDroid forums and found a thread indicating that this is a common problem.

Some users who posted in that thread were able to connect after they disabled the firewall on the PC, and others were able to connect by deleting the cookies in the browser. However, I think the fundamental cause of the problem is IPTables in Android Jelly Bean (see this comment). Anyway, taking all these factors into consideration, here is the way I got around the problem when it occurred:

On the laptop

1. Make sure the firewall is disabled.

As I use UFW on my laptop, all I need to do is:

# ufw disable

2. Launch Firefox and delete all cookies.

3. Open http://web.airdroid.com/

On the phone

1. Power down the phone, then power it up again.

2. Disable ‘Mobile data’ so that the phone cannot connect to the Internet via the mobile network, only via WiFi.

3. Enable WiFi.

4. Launch AirDroid.

From then on use AirDroid as usual, i.e. click on ‘Start’ and then either click on the camera icon and point the camera at the QR Code on the AirDroid page in the brower window or type the 6-character passcode displayed on the phone in the passcode box in the browser window and click ‘Login’.

That’s it!

AirDroid is a novel and useful application that now enables me to manage my Android phone from within Linux without needing to use WINE. Nice! :-)

(My thanks to Gentoo Forums user Q-collective in the thread [Workaround] Syncing Galaxy S3: What mediaplayer is capable? for mentioning AirDroid, otherwise I would never have known about it.)

EDIT November 5, 2012: I have used AirDroid on my home network and a public network, both using DHCP, not static IP addresses. I think AirDroid does not work if you use static IP addressing, so if you still run into trouble after following all the steps listed above, also check if you have a static IP address specified in the phone and router, and set them to use dynamic IP addressing instead.

EDIT November 26, 2012: Apparently some people — even those using static IP addresses — can get AirDroid working in their home network simply by rebooting their home router, so that’s something else you could try.

Editing from a Linux PC the phone book (contacts list) in an Android phone

A mobile phone stores contacts in the phone itself and/or on the SIM. Over the years, the phone book on my SIM became cluttered with duplicate entries, inconsistently-named contacts, and so on. I decided recently to tidy up the phone book, and looked for a way to do it from Linux.

Now, the last time I tidied up my phone book was back in 2003 when my SIM was in a Sony Ericsson T68i. These days I’m using the same SIM in an Android smartphone: the HTC Desire. Back then I used a shareware application called Mobile Navigator on a laptop running Windows XP. So, naturally, I thought it would be possible to do something similar from a PC running Linux.

An indirect method of editing a phone book in an Android phone is recommended in many Web forums. The advice is to synchronise the phone’s phone book with GMail on your PC, edit the contacts in GMail on the PC and then the contacts will be updated in the phone when the phone next synchronises with GMail. That is all very well, but I don’t want to import my phone contacts into GMail and thus have them stored in ‘The Cloud’, plus I don’t see why I should be forced to do that just to make it easier for me to tidy a phone book in my phone. So I set about searching for an application to do the job.

My search turned up three applications that appeared to enable a user to edit the phone book (phone and SIM):

1. Gammu (CLI) and Wammu (GUI front-end), FOSS with versions for both Linux and Windows.

2. MOBILedit!, a closed-source commercial product for Windows.

3. MyPhoneExplorer (Version 1.8.1), closed-source ‘donationware’ for Windows, recommended in various forums and that has been used with WINE in Linux. Not only does MyPhoneExplorer allow you to edit the phone book, it also provides a host of other features such as: viewing the phone’s call logs, messages, hardware status, files and applications; sending messages via the PC; etc. It’s a nifty application.

Web browsing told me that Gammu/Wammu does not yet work with the HTC Desire (see the bug report Don’t get any connection to HTC Desire via bluetooth in Wammu/Gammu). This is a pity, as Wammu and Gammu look well-designed, and Wammu has a professional feel to it.

The price for MOBILedit! is not extortionate but I wanted to find a cost-free solution if possible, and, more importantly, I could find no evidence on the Web of MOBILedit! having been used with WINE in Linux to edit the phone books in the HTC Desire.

The MyPhoneExplorer forums include a thread on using it with WINE, so MyPhoneExplorer looked like my only option (although it is a pity it is not FOSS). I installed MyPhoneExplorer with its own WINEPREFIX but, despite following the instructions in the MyPhoneExplorer forums, I was unable to get MyPhoneExplorer to connect to the HTC Desire via a USB cable in Linux. This may be because, despite what I have read on the android developers Web site (see Using Hardware Devices and OEM USB Drivers), as is the case with Windows it is necessary in Linux to install ADB USB drivers (the ADB drivers can be installed in Linux by installing the Android SDK). However, I was able to connect MyPhoneExplorer to my HTC Desire via WiFi at home (but not in a hotel, as connection depends on the router and internal network IP address space), and via Bluetooth (anywhere).

How to install MyPhoneExplorer in WINE

1. Use the Android Market to install MyPhoneExplorer Client on the phone.

2. Surf over to the MyPhoneExplorer Home Page and download MyPhoneExplorer_Setup_1.8.1.exe to ~/Desktop/

3. Open a Konsole/Terminal window and perform all the following steps in the same window.

4. Install MyPhoneExplorer on your PC under WINE:

$ cd
$ export WINEPREFIX=$HOME/.wine-myphoneexplorer
$ export WINEARCH="win32"
$ winecfg
$ wget "http://download.microsoft.com/download/5/a/d/5ad868a0-8ecd-4bb0-a882-fe53eb7ef348/VB6.0-KB290887-X86.exe"
$ wine VB6.0-KB290887-X86.exe
$ cd ./.wine-myphoneexplorer/drive_c/
$ cp $HOME/Desktop/MyPhoneExplorer_Setup_1.8.1.exe .
$ mv ${WINEPREFIX}/drive_c/windows/system32/oleaut32.dll ${WINEPREFIX}/drive_c/windows/system32/oleaut32-alt.dll
$ mv ${WINEPREFIX}/drive_c/windows/system32/olepro32.dll ${WINEPREFIX}/drive_c/windows/system32/olepro32-alt.dll
$ echo -e REGEDIT4\\n\\n[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\\Software\\Wine\\DllOverrides]\\n\"asycfilt\"=\"native\"\\n\"comcat\"=\"native\"\\n\"msvbvm60\"=\"native\"\\n\"oleaut32\"=\"native\"\\n\"oleaut32\"=\"native\"\\n\"olepro32\"=\"native\"\\n\"stdole2.tlb\"=\"native\"\\n[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\\Software\\MyPhoneExplorer]\\n\"Language\"=\"English.lng\" > temp.reg
$ wine regedit temp.reg
$ wget http://www.kegel.com/wine/winetricks
$ chmod +x winetricks
$ ./winetricks # Install Visual Basic 6 SP6 (I had to do this as well as wine VB6.0-KB290887-X86.exe)
$ ./winetricks # Install msxml3
$ wine MyPhoneExplorer_Setup_1.8.1.exe # Install MyPhoneExplorer

(Make sure you select the WINEPREFIX first when using winetricks)

5. Edit your Desktop Environment’s menu to use the following command for launching MyPhoneExplorer:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/fitzcaraldo/.wine-myphoneexplorer" WINEARCH="win32" wine C:\\windows\\command\\start.exe /Unix /home/fitzcarraldo/.wine-myphoneexplorer/dosdevices/c:/users/Public/Start\ Menu/Programs/MyPhoneExplorer/MyPhoneExplorer.lnk

(Of course replace “fitzcarraldo” with your user name.)

How to connect via Bluetooth

1. Look up the phone’s Bluetooth MAC address in the phone itself, write it down and keep it to hand. (I use the MAC address 11:22:33:AA:BB:C1 in the examples below.)

2. Enable Blutooth on your PC and phone, make them both discoverable, and pair them.

3. Launch MyPhoneExplorer Client on the phone and wait a few seconds for it to load and run.

4. Now check which channel is used by MyPhoneExplorer Client (In the example below it is Channel 17):

$ sudo sdptool browse
Inquiring ...
Browsing 11:22:33:AA:BB:C1 ...
Service RecHandle: 0x10000
Service Class ID List:
"PnP Information" (0x1200)

Service Name: Headset Gateway
Service RecHandle: 0x10001
Service Class ID List:
"Headset Audio Gateway" (0x1112)
"Generic Audio" (0x1203)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 1
Profile Descriptor List:
"Headset" (0x1108)
Version: 0x0100

Service Name: Handsfree Gateway
Service RecHandle: 0x10002
Service Class ID List:
"Handsfree Audio Gateway" (0x111f)
"Generic Audio" (0x1203)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 2
Profile Descriptor List:
"Handsfree" (0x111e)
Version: 0x0105

Service Name: Object Push
Service RecHandle: 0x10003
Service Class ID List:
"OBEX Object Push" (0x1105)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 3
"OBEX" (0x0008)
Profile Descriptor List:
"OBEX Object Push" (0x1105)
Version: 0x0100

Service RecHandle: 0x10004
Service Class ID List:
"AV Remote Target" (0x110c)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
PSM: 23
"AVCTP" (0x0017)
uint16: 0x100
Profile Descriptor List:
"AV Remote" (0x110e)
Version: 0x0100

Service Name: BRCM Advanced Audio
Service RecHandle: 0x10005
Service Class ID List:
"Audio Source" (0x110a)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
PSM: 25
"AVDTP" (0x0019)
uint16: 0x102
Profile Descriptor List:
"Advanced Audio" (0x110d)
Version: 0x0102

Service Name: Phonebook Access PSE
Service RecHandle: 0x10006
Service Class ID List:
"Phonebook Access - PSE" (0x112f)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 4
"OBEX" (0x0008)
Profile Descriptor List:
"Phonebook Access" (0x1130)
Version: 0x0100

Service Name: OBEX File Transfer
Service RecHandle: 0x10007
Service Class ID List:
"OBEX File Transfer" (0x1106)
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 5
"OBEX" (0x0008)
Profile Descriptor List:
"OBEX File Transfer" (0x1106)
Version: 0x0100

Service Name: MyPhoneExplorer
Service RecHandle: 0x10008
Service Class ID List:
UUID 128: 00001101-0000-1000-7000-00304b7f34de
Protocol Descriptor List:
"L2CAP" (0x0100)
"RFCOMM" (0x0003)
Channel: 17

5. Bind a virtual serial device to the phone (You can look up the phone’s Bluetooth MAC address in the phone itself to double check):

$ sudo rfcomm bind 1 11:22:33:AA:BB:C1 17

N.B. If you have been tinkering already with binding, and the virtual device /dev/rfcomm1 is therefore already bound, you will get an error message saying “Can't create device: Address already in use“. You can release the virtual device by using the command:

$ sudo rfcomm release /dev/rfcomm1

6. Create a symbolic link for the virtual serial link:

$ export WINEPREFIX=$HOME/.wine-myphoneexplorer
$ sudo ln -is /dev/rfcomm1 ${WINEPREFIX}/dosdevices/com2
$ sudo chmod 777 ${WINEPREFIX}/dosdevices/com2 # you may not need to do this, as the permissions may already be 777.

7. Launch MyPhoneExplorer (e.g. in KDE this would be: Kickoff > Applications > Wine> Programs > MyPhoneExplorer > MyPhoneExplorer), then press F2 (or select File > Settings).

8. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Phone type’ to be ‘SonyEricsson phone with modeminterface’. Tick ‘Stable connection (some features are deactivated)’.

9. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Phone type’ to be ‘Phone with Google Android-OS’.

10. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Connect via…’ to be ‘Bluetooth’ and enter “COM2″ (upper case, and without the quotes) and click on ‘OK’.

11. Press F1 (or select File > Connect) and your PC should be able to connect to the phone and synchronise with your phone’s phone book (Extras > Start Multi-sync), thus enabling you to edit the contents and re-synchronise to update the phone book in the phone.

Script to make subsequent connections via Bluetooth easier

Note that the channel used by MyPhoneExplorer Client will change the next time you want to connect, so there is no point editing /etc/bluetooth/rfcomm.conf (the Linux configuration file in which you would normally specify the channel). Therefore, to make life a little easier, I wrote a simple Bash script to automate as much as possible the process of reconnecting via Bluetooth in future. If you want to do the same, use your favourite text editor and save the following script with the file name myphoneexplorer.sh:

#!/bin/bash
echo -n "Please switch on Bluetooth via System Tray icon, make Bluetooth discoverable then press ENTER: "
read RESPONSE
echo -n "Please enable Bluetooth on the phone, make it discoverable then press ENTER: "
read RESPONSE
export WINEPREFIX="/home/fitzcarraldo/.wine-myphoneexplorer"
export WINEARCH="win32"
echo "Checking current rfcomm status..."
sudo rfcomm -a
echo "Trying to release rfcomm1 in case it is in use (no message means rfcomm1 is released and is now OK to use,"
echo "and the message Cannot release device: No such device also means rfcomm1 is OK to use)..."
sudo rfcomm release /dev/rfcomm1
echo -n "Now please launch MyPhoneExplorer Client on the phone, wait a few seconds then press ENTER: "
read RESPONSE
echo "Find channel of MyPhoneExplorer Client:"
sudo sdptool browse
echo -n "Enter the channel number: "
read RESPONSE
sudo rfcomm bind 1 11:22:33:AA:BB:C1 $RESPONSE
echo "Checking current rfcomm status..."
sudo rfcomm -a
echo "If all is OK then please launch MyPhoneExplorer from Kickoff > Applications > Wine > Programs > MyPhoneExplorer"
echo "and press F1 to connect to the phone."

(Of course replace “fitzcarraldo” with your user name, and replace “11:22:33:AA:BB:C1” with the Bluetooth MAC address of your phone.)

Then make the script executable:

$ chmod +x myphoneexplorer.sh

The next time you want to use MyPhoneExplorer, open a Konsole/Terminal, execute the script:

$ sh myphoneexplorer.sh

and follow the instructions it displays in the Konsole/Terminal window.

How to connect via WiFi

Connecting MyPhoneExplorer to the phone via WiFi is easier than via Bluetooth. Note that WiFi connection will not work with a public WiFi network, just a home WiFi network.

1. Enable WiFi on your PC and phone.

2. Launch MyPhoneExplorer Client on the phone and wait a few seconds for it to load and run.

3. Launch MyPhoneExplorer (e.g. in KDE this would be: Kickoff > Applications > Wine> Programs > MyPhoneExplorer > MyPhoneExplorer), then press F2 (or select File > Settings).

4. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Phone type’ to be ‘SonyEricsson phone with modeminterface’. Tick ‘Stable connection (some features are deactivated)’.

5. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Phone type’ to be ‘Phone with Google Android-OS’.

6. Select ‘Connection’ in the left pane and then select ‘Connect via…’ to be ‘WiFi’ and click on ‘OK’.

7. Press F1 (or select File > Connect) and your PC should be able to connect to the phone and synchronise with your phone’s phone book (Extras > Start Multi-sync), thus enabling you to edit the contents and re-synchronise to update the phone book in the phone.

Useful references

The MyPhoneExplorer forums are oriented to Windows as it is a Windows application, but there is a thread for Linux users: HowTo: Use MyPhoneExplorer under GNU/Linux (English Version)

The thread for Windows users of MyPhoneExplorer may also be of some use: Howto and FAQ: Use Android Phones with MyPhoneExplorer

Limitations in WINE

The only limitation I have found using MyPhoneExplorer 1.8.1 in WINE is that it crashes if I try to cut and paste when editing a phone book entry. Additionally, some people have reported that the buttons on the button bar do not work when you are connected to the phone; they usually do work for me (apparently it depends on whether you have installed msxml3) but sometimes don’t. In any case, if they don’t then you can use the pull-down menus from the menu bar instead.

Other than that, MyPhoneExplorer works well in WINE and enables me to edit the phone book in my Android phone without involving Big Brother! It’s a nice application.

Firewall rules if using WiFi

If you’re using MyPhoneExplorer to connect with the phone via WiFi instead of Bluetooth, and your PC has a firewall enabled, according to a post on 7 June 2011 in the MyPhoneExplorer forums you have to configure the firewall with the following rules:

TCP port 80 (outgoing) – Check for update
TCP port 5210 (outgoing) – Communication with client
UDP port 5211 (outgoing) – Communication with client
UDP port 5212 (inbound) – Broadcast from the client

Below I list the rules I implemented in Uncomplicated Firewall:

# ufw status
Status: active

To              Action          From

--              ------          ----
Anywhere        ALLOW           5212/udp

80/tcp          ALLOW OUT       Anywhere
5210/tcp        ALLOW OUT       Anywhere
5211/udp        ALLOW OUT       Anywhere

Alternatively you could just disable the firewall on your PC while you’re using MyPhoneExplorer with your phone, which I do anyway when I’m at home as my home network is protected by the firewall in my router.

EDIT (October 25, 2012): Now there is another way of editing an Android phone’s contacts list from Linux: AirDroid. And you don’t need to mess around with WINE to use it. For details see my post AirDroid, a handy Android app for managing your phone from Linux.

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