Dropbox revisited

In a previous post I explained how I installed Kfilebox, an unofficial KDE front-end for Dropbox. However, development of Kfilebox appears to have stopped, as the original author posted the following recently on a blog:

“I have stopped working on kfilebox after some updates in dropbox. Shortly: there is no way to get recent changed files, no more access to config options, cant configure it.”

Nevertheless I continued using Kfilebox. However, after a few days the Kfilebox icon stopped appearing in the KDE System Tray, and clicking on ‘Show hidden icons’ > ‘Kfilebox’ on the Panel displayed “The Dropbox daemon isn’t running” in the pop-up menu. Also, if I clicked on the hidden Kfilebox icon and selected ‘Preferences…’ the Dropbox folder field was empty and I had to keep re-entering the location of the Dropbox folder. So I decided to uninstall Kfilebox and try using Dropbox directly with KDE. I performed the steps listed below.

  1. Uninstall Kfilebox:

    # emerge -C kfilebox

  2. Remove any associated directories and files that might be left over:

    # rm -rf /home/fitzcarraldo/.dropbox
    # rm -rf /home/fitzcarraldo/.dropbox-dist
    # rm /home/fitzcarraldo/.kde4/share/config/kfileboxrc

  3. Install Dropbox:

    # emerge dropbox

  4. Do not edit /etc/conf.d/dropbox and do not configure Gentoo to launch the Dropbox daemon at start-up (i.e. do not add /etc/init.d/dropbox to the default runlevel). Instead configure KDE to launch the daemon when logging-in to KDE:
    1. Kickoff > System Settings > Startup and Shutdown
    2. Click on ‘Autostart’ in the left pane.
    3. Click on the ‘Add Script…’ button on the right side of the window.
    4. Enter the location of the Dropbox daemon in the box in the pop-up window. I entered “/opt/dropbox/dropboxd” (without the quotes) in the box and clicked ‘OK’.
  5. Run Dropbox for the first time and configure the local installation:
    1. Open a Dolphin window and browse to the directory containing the daemon (/opt/dropbox/) and double-click on dropboxd to launch the daemon.
    2. The Dropbox set-up window will pop-up and it should be obvious what to do from there onwards. As I already had a Dropbox account I selected ‘I already have a Dropbox account’ and clicked ‘Next’, I then entered my e-mail address, my Dropbox password and my computer’s name in the boxes and clicked ‘Next’. I left the default free 2 GB option selected and clicked ‘Next’. I left the default set-up ‘Typical’ selected and clicked ‘Install’. I read the introductory information displayed in the next couple of windows and clicked ‘Next’. I clicked ‘Finish’ in the final ‘That’s it!’ window.
  6. A Dropbox icon then appears in the System Tray on the Panel and synchronises with the Dropbox directory on the remote Dropbox server.

Now if I click on the Dropbox icon in the System Tray, the Dropbox directory window pops up. If I right-click on the icon in the System Tray, a menu pops-up with the expected Dropbox options.

So there was no need to use Kfilebox after all, as using the Dropbox daemon directly is just as user-friendly.

About these ads

About Fitzcarraldo
A Linux user with an interest in all things technical.

One Response to Dropbox revisited

  1. scibyr says:

    Give SpiderOak a try – file sync tool with security in mind – details on their site.

    scibyr

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 51 other followers

%d bloggers like this: